Toyota GR86 Forum - GT86 Forum, Subaru BRZ Forum, Scion ... banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone noticed that the engine bay is extremely hot after driving? Is this normal? Obviously it will heat up but with this car it's way hotter than any other vehicle I have owned. If I drive for 20 minutes and then pop the hood it practically burns my hand lol. Also, to clarify, no issues I am seeing with engine temps, coolant, or oil temps etc ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I think it has to do with how thin the aluminum hood is. I would say the actual engine heat is normal, but yes don't hold the hood open with your hands too long after driving! When I opened it for the first time after driving, I almost dropped it cause it was so hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think it has to do with how thin the aluminum hood is. I would say the actual engine heat is normal, but yes don't hold the hood open with your hands too long after driving! When I opened it for the first time after driving, I almost dropped it cause it was so hot.
Yes that's what I figured. My other vehicle is a 2007 and I previously owned a 2002. I know the new vehicles are not constructed quite like they used to be. It's also been in the mid 90s since I picked up the car so I think that may be a contributing factor.
 

·
Registered
22 GR86 6MT; 22 Corolla
Joined
·
531 Posts
This is something another thread touched on regarding excess heat in the cockpit. Some folks aren't familiar with how some 'not all' sports cars can have so much heat generated by the engine and exhaust that it protrudes into the cockpit. Specific cars that come immediately into my mine that I've owned are the Eunos Roadster '1G MX5', FC RX-7, RX-8, all 4 DSM's I've owned, and both twins, though not quite to the level of the RX-fill in the blanks here. This car is not quite to the level of heat protrusion from my personal experience. Interesting tidbit - the FC RX-7 actually had an idiot light that warned of excess exhaust temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is something another thread touched on regarding excess heat in the cockpit. Some folks aren't familiar with how some 'not all' sports cars can have so much heat generated by the engine and exhaust that it protrudes into the cockpit. Specific cars that come immediately into my mine that I've owned are the Eunos Roadster '1G MX5', FC RX-7, RX-8, all 4 DSM's I've owned, and both twins, though not quite to the level of the RX-fill in the blanks here. This car is not quite to the level of heat protrusion from my personal experience. Interesting tidbit - the FC RX-7 actually had an idiot light that warned of excess exhaust temperature.
Thank you for this!
 

·
Registered
22' Steel GR86 6MT
Joined
·
194 Posts
This is something another thread touched on regarding excess heat in the cockpit. Some folks aren't familiar with how some 'not all' sports cars can have so much heat generated by the engine and exhaust that it protrudes into the cockpit. Specific cars that come immediately into my mine that I've owned are the Eunos Roadster '1G MX5', FC RX-7, RX-8, all 4 DSM's I've owned, and both twins, though not quite to the level of the RX-fill in the blanks here. This car is not quite to the level of heat protrusion from my personal experience. Interesting tidbit - the FC RX-7 actually had an idiot light that warned of excess exhaust temperature.
Can confirm, was that way with both RX-8s I've owned. Also the floor would get hot from the transmission
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
BSFC of modern N/A engines won't vary much more than a couple percent. I don't think the fuel economy numbers are indicative of anything but the general disregard of sportscar drivers for fuel economy or the inability to understand how to drive for efficiency. I just got 33.2 mpg out of the last tank including driving with a big rocket bike sitting higher than the roof and sideways in back with the AC blasting and windows down, though driving more for efficiency with only a few full throttle acceleration events. For a relatively low-torque 2.4 with short gears and RWD (more loss than FWD), that doesn't seem too bad.
 

·
Registered
22 GR86 6MT; 22 Corolla
Joined
·
531 Posts
I think some people do not drive with economy in mind but it is certainly possible to get good mileage with the twins. The automatics have a decided advantage imo since they will shift lower 'which you can replicate with a manual', and from what my understanding is the gearing is more favourable towards automatics vs manuals. In addition, folks running wider, stickier tyres will have reduced MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
EPA numbers are standardized, there is no driver factor.
Yes, it's a known test that can and is often gamed by programming and eunuch tech so that the results are potentially closer to what your average dolt should get if they drive a similar cycle in a similar often unrealistically relaxed manner as the test. (Emissions testing is also gamed as displayed by the investigations and fines going out to Chrysler and almost all the trash German brands). Not every car is tested, either, there are formulas the OEMs can use to extrapolate data from platform mate vehicles (which is how you end up with CA suits, like Ford with the C-Max not meeting numbers). Manuals aren't as consistent as they are far more dependent on the driver, so ruling out that factor leaves them at a disadvantage, which I don't think the OEMs are bothered by as they don't really want to sell manuals and they primarily remain in sports cars where people are less concerned about mileage. In the case of the twins, the ridiculously short gearing (to make up for the lack of torque, which is the true root of the issue) of the cars hurts them in testing vs wider-ranging CVTs and multi-speed autos in spite of their weight and cda being advantageous against other vehicles, like a Civic or—even worse with its less efficient AWD—a CRV. While I usually just beat the EPA highway ratings with a combined cycle when I drive (all previous cars were higher torque/lower hp engines with either outright taller gearing or the same top gear ratio only with 1/3 the hp, but 1/2 the torque peaking at 1/2 the rpm), I well exceed the highway rating on a combined cycle in this car. My point is that people are getting bad mileage because they are driving aggressively and don't care, are in heavy traffic almost all of the time, or don't know how to drive. These cars are capable of a lot better and it doesn't take hypermiling to do so. Hell, I got stuck in heavy traffic going to Cape Cod yesterday and was driving around 75 with several bouts to 100 on the way back and I'm still looking at 32 average on the computer (probably more like 30 when I calculate it at fillup). I keep beating this drum so that potential buyers don't think 27 mpg is the best this car will do if they would have to employ this as a daily driver and so settle for something else instead.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top