In this new comparison from Car and Driver, they discovered that the Subaru BRZ and Toyota GR 86 are better overall when compared to the Veloster N and VW GTI.


1st Place (Tie):
2022 Subaru BRZ


Highs: More power in the right spots, quicker, excellent manual gearbox.
Lows:
Engine is buzzy at redline, lacks the practicality of a hatchback.
Verdict:
The affordable sports coupe isn't dead, yet.

Subaru's BRZ and the Toyota GR86 have the performance-car basics down. Rear-drive? Done. Manual? Got it. Lightweight? Naturally. Not to mention, the heavily refreshed second-generation sports-coupe designs weren't overworked. The interiors are free of senseless tech, and the digital instrument cluster is the most sensible since the Honda S2000.

ON BACK ROADS, THE REAR-DRIVE BALANCE AND LIGHTWEIGHT FEEL PULLED THE TOYOBARUS AHEAD OF THE FRONT-DRIVERS. SHIFT ACTION FROM THE MANUAL IS SHORT AND SWEET.

The easy-to-read strip-style tachometer requires Track mode, but either way, it informs the driver of the revolution under the hood. Gone is the 205-hp 2.0-liter flat-four that moaned like an injured deer. In its place is a free-breathing 2.4-liter that's good for 228 horsepower. The available torque is up from 154 pound-feet to 184 and peaks at 3700 rpm as opposed to the previous 5400 revs. More important, the buzz-killing dip that occurred between 3500 and 4500 rpm is removed. The engine's artificial soundtrack is like a beehive beneath the dash near the 7500-rpm redline, though it at least sounds more natural than synthetic.

When it comes to acceleration, spinning is winning. Not enough and the Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tires will imitate a jackal stuck in quicksand. Too much and you'll be in a cloud of smoke like Snoop Dogg. Give it the revs to around 4500, ease off the clutch, and lift that toe that went to market. Load transfers to the driven tires—a traction benefit no front-driver will ever obtain—and the BRZ and GR86 are the quickest of the group off the line. The Torsen limited-slip differential locks the torque between the rear tires as they step out of line.
One way to break the tie: Consider the free day of advanced driver training and the two years or 24,000 miles of free maintenance the GR86 offers.
There's enough wheelspin to throw off the butt dyno, but stick with it. The six-speed manual is fluid in its action—one of the best DIY boxes left on the market—and it likes to be used. Go ahead. Grip it and rip it just before the 7300-rpm fuel cutoff. Both the BRZ and GR86 take the abuse in stride while racing to 60 mph in 5.4 seconds, 0.8 quicker than the former 2.0-liter car. The BRZ covers the quarter-mile in 13.9 seconds at 101 mph, a tenth quicker than the GR86 whose engine had logged 1500 fewer miles.

Fully loaded at $31,455, the BRZ has a tight rear seat that might not be the most accommodating, or really at all accommodating, but it at least folds flat to hold four wheels and tires. This sports coupe is surely an experience no front-driver can replicate.https://www.caranddriver.com/photos...baru-brz-toyota-gr86-vw-gti-compared-gallery/

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